Nevada Unemployment Extensions Information

Nevada Unemployment Benefits Extension


A federal unemployment extension is often unavailable to states when the economy is recovering. However, Nevada has had high unemployment rates and activated benefits extension more than other states. If you have wondered “How can I extend unemployment in NV?” you should know that it isn’t a particularly easy process. Extensions are only permitted during times of high unemployment rates across the country.

To find important information about how to get an unemployment extension, see the following sections:

•    What is a Federal Unemployment Extension in Nevada?
•    How Can I get an Unemployment Extension in Nevada? 
•    What are the 4 Tiers of Emergency Unemployment Compensation?
•    What is Denial of Extended Benefits?
•    Is There Anything I can do to Extend Unemployment?

What is a Federal Unemployment Extension in Nevada?


There are two types of unemployment extension programs administered in partnership between the federal government and state. The Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) policy is a temporary federal unemployment extension authorized by Congress when individuals exhaust state unemployment benefits.

This program was created in response to the recession of 2008-2009, when Congress wanted to address negative impacts on individuals and families. It ended in 2012 and was not intended nor able to address chronic unemployment. The need for a permanent unemployment benefits extension led to the Extended Benefits program (EB), which is activated during certain times when Nevada’s unemployment rate is too high. Nevada has had one of the highest unemployment rates in the country since the recession of 2008-2009 and has extended unemployment insurance benefits several times since 2012.


How Can I get an Unemployment Extension? — Receiving Notice of Extended Benefits 


When extended unemployment insurance coverage benefits are activated by Nevada, recipients will receive a letter with the date to file, qualification criteria and any instructions. Petitioners can always check with the Nevada ESD or local unemployment for specific details. If an unemployment compensation extension is active, a notice will also be posted on the Department of Labor’s website for Nevada. Unless state lawmakers push to reactivate extended benefits, they generally remain unavailable. 

Under statutes on the Nevada unemployment compensation extension, benefits will generally be extended when the state unemployment rate equals or exceeds 6 percent. If this happens, the state will indicate an “on” period for extended benefits that will last up to 13 weeks before needing congressional approval to continue. Extended benefits are not the same as “Additional Benefits,” which are given to those with special circumstances or high unemployment. However, both extended benefits and additional benefits cannot be collected at the same time, and applicants must choose one or the other. 


Some specific regulations regarding Nevada unemployment benefits extension stipulate that if the state is in a period of extended benefits, then individuals must meet additional requirements. For example, to claim extended unemployment insurance benefits, recipients must have no objection to different forms of work than previously performed. They must also accept a reduced wage compared to what was previously earned, and demonstrate increased efforts to find work. 


What are the 4 Tiers of Emergency Unemployment Compensation?


With regards to unemployment extension, there are four tiers of federal unemployment compensation extension that were enacted through EUC legislation in times of high unemployment. The first tier is a 14 week period, during which benefits continue to be provided. If tier two is active, Nevada’s unemployment rate has remained too high or risen, and this has activated an additional 14 weeks of unemployment benefits. The third tier adds 13 weeks and a fourth tier was later created to provide an additional 6 weeks of unemployment benefits to struggling states like Nevada. If you do not receive notice of these extensions, contact your local Nevada Unemployment Office and continue to mail your weekly claim.  


What is Denial of Extended Benefits?


Extended benefits can be denied if Nevada’s ESD determines that you did not accept work, or refused to search for suitable work. However, if the work was not listed with the JobConnect office or other unemployment agency, extended benefits cannot be denied for not accepting work.

All extended benefits are separate from Trade Readjustment Allowances and Disaster Unemployment Assistance, but receiving these allowances may make some individuals ineligible for extended benefits. If you were denied despite the activation of the Federal Extended benefits program, it is possible to regain eligibility for unemployment compensation extension if you obtain earnings equal or higher than you would normally receive weekly and then reapply. Because the extensions are based on unemployment rates, there isn’t anything a single applicant can do to create the need for extended benefits.

Unemploymentclaims.org is a privately owned website that is not owned or operated by any government agency.